Friday Friends: Sarah E. Boucher & Midnight Sisters

Happy Friday, Friends!  I love to host authors and bloggers on Fridays.  it is my way of thanking the community which has been so supportive of me.  Today I am delighted to feature author Sarah E. Boucher, author of Becoming Beauty and Midnight Sisters, both fabulous interpretations of traditional fairy tales.  Welcome, Sarah!

06-07-16 Sarah B BW

1. So, what have you written?

I’m the author of two Young Adult novels, Becoming Beauty and Midnight Sisters. Becoming Beauty is a retelling of Beauty and the Beast. Bella, the Beauty character, is at least as beastly and entitled as she is beautiful. When she’s forced into servitude in the Beast’s household, she must learn to look past the Beast’s exterior to discover what true beauty is.

Likewise Midnight Sisters is an adaptation of the Twelve Dancing Princesses. The cast is crammed with mischievous noblewomen, their angry father, and a household full of servants. Jonas, a gardener who is smitten with the eldest of the ladies, must question everything he’s every learned and risk his livelihood to save Lady Ariela and her sisters from their father’s wrath and their own folly.

  1. What subjects & causes are near and dear to your heart?

I’ve spent fourteen years working with kindergarteners and preschoolers. Education is huge with me. I’m always trying to plant the idea of becoming a reader, writer, and a lifelong learner in the minds and hearts of my students. Anyone can get a college education, whether or not their family can afford to send them. Take it from me, there are countless programs out there for those who are willing to work hard.

  1. Are you a Pantser or a Planner?

I’m definitely a pantser. Character-driven writing is my jam. I’m never quite sure where my whackadoodle characters will lead me, but I always know the adventure will be incomparable, and so much more fun than planning every last story detail. Call it luck, fate, or inspiration, but because I write like I do, beautiful patterns emerge on their own. It’s truly magical.

  1. Tell us about your love of all things British.

British movies and TV—especially anything that’s a period piece—are a huge addiction for me. Sherlock, Downton Abbey, The Great British Baking Show, Doctor Who, etc. I adore them all. That means I’m completely in love with Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hiddleston, and about a million other British actors. I’m also totally obsessed with Shakespeare and Jane Austen. Devouring their brand of literature and making a home in their worlds makes me feel smarter, like I’m part of a secret universe only a few others understand.

  1. What is one unusual thing about you?

Anyone might guess that I’m completely in love with fairy tales, but what they may not guess is that I have a pretty large collection of them in my home library. Also, even though I’m a grown up, I sometimes read them to myself at night, like my own personal bedtime stories. It’s just so cozy!

  1. Ranch or Blue Cheese?

If you’re talking about carrots or chicken wings dipped in either of the above, then the answer is ranch. All day long. Otherwise I’m one of those weirdos who usually goes for some type of schmancy vinaigrette, probably with berries or exotic peppercorns in it. Because I’m so fancy. You already know . . .

  1. What are you working on right now?

Another fairy tale twist is in the works! Rumplestilskin is the inspiration for my third novel. Elyse’s life is turned upside down when she loses her parents to illness and must seek employment in a new town. When she’s given an impossible task to prove her abilities, a mysterious stranger comes to her aid. A ball hosted by the crown prince draws near and demand for Elyse’s gowns grows. The stranger once again comes to Elyse’s aid and wins her gratitude. But is it enough to win her heart or will the crown prince claim it as his own?

I’m still in the early stages, but I’m loving this story! It’s a little Rumplestilkin. Cinderella, and The Shoemaker and the Elves rolled into one!

  1. What TV shows/ movies are you watching these days?

Other than Netflix I only watch superhero shows these days. That’s Arrow, because Stephen Amell is both beautiful and amazing and 100% to blame for my DC obsession. And Flash, because that entire cast cracks me up and I’m a little in love with Grant Gustin too. And Legends of Tomorrow, because most of that cast was on either Arrow or Flash at one point, so it was only a matter of time until I fell in love with Legends as well.

  1. Do you have a theme song?

Right now Sit Still, Look Pretty by Daya rings pretty true. Mostly because I can get really dolled up. The 50s are my era, my lovelies, and I will use any excuse to don red lipstick, a big dress, a crinoline, and pretty, pretty shoes.

Sure, I’m a pretty girl

Up in a pretty world

But they say pretty hurts

And I don’t wanna sit still

I’m a pretty girl

Up in a pretty world

But no, I won’t sit still, look pretty

 

Then, just when I look amazing, I open my big mouth and my personality falls out. I’m silly. I’m crazy. I’m witty and obnoxious. I’m honest. So no, I can’t sit still and look pretty.

Plus that sounds kind of boring anyway.

  1. What is one thing you would tell your younger self?

My journey has been vastly different from the picture I carried in my head when I was a girl. If I could talk to the young Sarie, I’d tell her to strap in and prepare for an amazing ride, because cool stuff is on the way and it will come from directions she’d never expect. Also, I’d give her a little life lesson I didn’t learn until I hit my mid-twenties:

Success doesn’t look the same for everyone.

About the Author:

Sarah E. Boucher is a lover of fairy stories, romance, anything BBC and Marvel, and really, really cute shoes. On weekdays she wears respectable shoes and serves as Miss B., the Queen of Kindergarten. On school holidays she writes stories about romance and adventure. And wears impractical super cute shoes.

Sarah is a graduate of Brigham Young University. She lives and works in northern Utah. Her novels include Becoming Beauty and Midnight Sisters. Visit Sarah at SarahEBoucher.com or connect with her on TwitterFacebook, or Instagram.

Author Pic

Gold

pyrite_header

Who wants to attract abundance? (Who doesn’t?) I have started my own manifesting abundance practice, combining elements from various teachings, and let me tell you, it’s working.  In more ways than I could have imagined.

As my friends and readers know, I have been working on wellness.  I read a ton of personal growth- type articles, books, my own faith community and am developing my own wellness toolkit. What works for me mat not work for you, I’m just sharing because starting the conversation can start somebody else’s journey.

So my kinesiologist suggested to me the crystal Pyrite.  I was intrigued because it’s a bit muted in hue, and it appealed to me. I find 24 karat gold a bit much, and I had even dipped my yellow gold engagement and wedding rings into white gold a few years ago.  But the muted tones I quite like.  I am an introvert, after all.

Admittedly, I have had a block when it comes to wealth and abundance.  I’ve observed persons who became “wealthy” and affluent who cease to function like nice, normal human beings.  So I’ve resisted it. Is it any wonder the universe hasn’t shown me abundance, then?

So to honor this new practice, I placed my pyrite bracelet on my nightstand beside my other crystals, bracelets and Himalayan salt lamp.  Some days I placed it in my clear glass Coventina dedication, with coins. It looks really pretty when I circle the top of the glass with the bracelet.

During this time I started practicing mindfulness- particularly with drinking.  I started drinking lemonade, honey tea, ginger ale, and the like, thinking “Liquid Gold” as I drank. I bought a scarf with sparkling threads, and I started bringing out my yellow gold jewelry again.  Wearing my pyrite bracelet every day and night. Applying my favorite True Gold eyeshadow highlighter. All with the intention of attracting abundance. (A couple years back, I wore orange for a month and sparked my creativity- publishing a book of poetry and recording a CD.)

I had lost my citrine crystal earlier in the year, and every time I passed my crystals I would think fervently, “Doh!  I wish I had my citrine!”  I honestly believe that just having that thought in my head seems to have activated her benefits.  Surprise checks, rebates, and royalties started coming in.   My new book sold more than a few copies each month.  My blog tour and book release party were quite successful, and my one of my guest posts received my most retweets ever!

Recognizing the power of thought and mindfulness, I amped up my prayers and gratitude. I added the dynamic of fierce, fervent thought.  It is the focus and for lack of a better word- loudness of the thought which seems to give it power.

Some days I awake and fervently thank God, Jesus, Mary, or Jesus-Mary-and-Joseph.  Some days I thank the Goddesses for their energy.  Does it really matter what religion one practices?  Not really.  So long as one is humble and kind to others.

Some days I fall asleep remembering the 80’s power ballad “Gold” by Spandau Ballet.

Nothing left to make me feel small
Luck has left me standing so tall

Gold!
(Gold)
Always believe in your soul
You’ve got the power to know
You’re indestructible, always believe in, ‘cos you are

Gold!
(Gold)
I’m glad that you’re bound to return
There’s something I could have learned
You’re indestructible, always believe in

I admit it’s not much, and I’m certainly not affluent.  I still struggle with rewarding myself with too many little desserts and not enough big major important things like good tennis shoes or a really good bra. But I am aware in a new way.  And one of the things that has turned me off from wealth in the past has been lack of community. So I selected another charity which I have wanted to support, and made a donation.  Felt really good.

It’s not magic. It’s work.  I have to remember to focus. I have to remember to do the work.  I have to sign up for these app companies that give you rebates. I have to connect with readers. All these lucky charms talismans are just things-  it’s the power of your thoughts/faith/belief and ACTIVITY that makes them “work.”

I’m now working on adding to my fervent thoughts of liquid gold- my health and my art-making. What if I applied this gold manifesting to health?  Can you imagine? I’m also working on my new book. I AM READY.

If I were to suddenly found myself extremely wealthy, I’d build two resorts on a tropical island- one for commercial use and one reserved just for my family and friends, and sponsor wellness retreats on site. That, and start a music education cable TV channel.

What would you do?

What’s stopping you?

You are Gold.

  Gold by Spandau Ballet

 

 

Finishing up the Book Tour with a Sweet Treat!

banner

It has been such a  joy touring with this book. Special thanks to Melissa Flicks for her excellent organizing and promotion!

Stop by today’s post by C. Streetlights on her blog here.

Join us tonight for the party on Facebook, if you can!

Peace,

Denise

 

Guest Post: Love Literary Style by Karin Gillespie

Happy Friday, Friends!  I love to spotlight authors and bloggers and readers on Fridays!  Today I am featuring Love Literary Style by Karin Gillespie. Read on for her Guest Post below! I particularly appreciate her reference to reviews and chicken pox.  I’m downloading this book today!  Are you? 


love-literary-style-book-tour-bannerLove Literary Style Book Tour
By author Karin Gillespie
Tour Date: November 1st-8th, 2016

Blurb:

Low brow meets high brow in a literary love story.

Can an emotionally-stunted literary novelist and a vivacious romance writer find their happily-ever after? Even when she becomes more successful than he? Love Literary Style spoofs romantic comedy tropes, winks at literary pretensions and pokes fun at book publishing.

Like Legally Blonde only in the literary world.

Inspired by the author’s New York Times article “Masters in Chick Lit.” A sparkling romantic comedy for fans of the Rosie Project.

Buy the Book:

AmazonUS
AmazonUK

About the Author:

2c93bc_f568288f57544254b991cfe17add7d80-mv2Karin Gillespie

Bio:

Karin Gillespie is the author of the national bestselling Bottom Dollar Girls series, 2016 Georgia Author of the Year, Co-author for Jill Connor Browne’s novel Sweet Potato Queen’s First Big Ass Novel. Her latest novel Love Literary Style was inspired by a New York Times article called “Masters in Chick Lit” that went viral and was shared by literary luminaries like Elizabeth Gilbert and Anne Rice. She’s written for the Washington Post and Writer Magazine and is book columnist and humor columnist for the Augusta Chronicle and Augusta Magazine respectively. She received a Georgia Author of the Year Award in 2016

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Amazon

Visit All the Stops:

November 1st

Romantic Reads and Such – Book Excerpt
Hello…Chick Lit – Book Promo/Excerpt

November 2nd

Bookish Lifestyle – Book Promo
Judging More Than Just The Cover – Author Q&A
Steamy Book Momma – Book Promo

November 3rd

Jena Books – Book Review/Promo
Emmathelittlebookworm – Book Promo

November 4th

Live Laugh & Love Books – Book Review
Key of Dee – Author Guest Post

November 5th

Bookaholic Babe – Book Promo
Book Lover in Florida – Book Excerpt/Promo
Anonymisses – Book Review

November 6th

The Belgian Reviewer – Author Guest Post
The Writing Garnet – Book Review
He Said Books or Me – Author Guest Post

November 7th

Novelgossip– Book Review/Promo
Chick Lit Central – Book Promo

November 8th

Elysium Bibliotheque – Book Promo
ItaPixie’s Book Corner – Book Review/Excerpt

Tour Arranged by:

hello-1

Coping with Crappy Reviews

 By Karin Gillespie

I’ll never forget it so long as I live. I was about to embark on my very first ten-city book tour when I went to Amazon and, lying in wait like a black widow spider, was my first customer review.
“Karin Gillespie should be boiled in oil for writing such a terrible book. I will NEVER get back the four precious hours of my life I spend slogging through her deathless prose. Was her publisher on crack? Burning’s not good enough for this book. I want to tear it to pieces, page by abysmal page, and then feed it to an alligator.”
Perhaps I exaggerate. The review wasn’t quite that scathing but it was bad enough that I wanted to call in sick for my book tour, fearing I’d be met by torch-carrying, pitchfork waving, angry mobs. Obviously I’d managed to write the world’s worst book.
Never mind that I’d gotten a starred Kirkus just a few weeks earlier. Clearly my crack-crazed publisher had bribed the reviewer. All of the praise and kudos I’d received up until then had been expunged from my mind. All I cared about was what Edna Cranky from Backwater N.C. had to say about my book, and Edna, bless her pea-picking heart, hated it.
How to Man Up
That was almost ten years ago. Ten years ago and a slew of bad reviews later, I’m actually grateful to dear old Edna. If I ever ran into her, instead of wringing her neck, I might actually hug it. Looking back on it, I actually appreciated a little skin-thickening right out of the gate. Bad reviews are like chicken pox: Best to get ‘em over with early in the game less they turn into shingles. I know some writers that published two or three books before they had an encounter with their own Ednas, and it wasn’t pretty.
I’ve never responded to a bad review, much as I’ve been tempted. Nor do I ever read a bad review more than once. (Good reviews, on the other hand, I read hundreds of times and recently had an especially good one tattooed on my bicep.)
I’ve learned to completely ignore the mean-spirited reviews. People who attack the author just aren’t worth spilling tears or swilling whiskey over. I’ve even got to the point where I welcome the occasional poor review so long as the criticism is constructive, and if you believe that I’ve got some swampland I’d like to sell you.
Actually, every bad review stings for a little while but I do occasionally learn from them, and I’m grateful to anyone who has taken the time to read the book and comment on it. Authors might not like bad reviews but there’s something even worse: No reviews whatsoever.

Friday Friends: Jerry Dwyer, Reader

Happy Friday, Friends!  I interview authors, bloggers, and readers on Fridays. We are #humanswholovebooks. Today I am delighted to share a very special interview with you: my own dear father, who instilled in me my love of reading and writing. Welcome, Dad!

img_4570

1. What are you reading right now?
Restless Hearts: Walking the Camino de Santiago by Roy Uprichard

2. What did you read last?
Who We Were Before by Leah Mercer (literary fiction I found on Kindle Unlimited)

3. What do you look for in a book?
I like to research before traveling – fiction, history and travel guides. Before going to Barcelona last year I read Barcelona by Robert Hughes, The Cemetery of Forgotten Books series (three books) by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The South: A Novel by Colm Toibin, and Rick Steves’ Pocket Barcelona.
See # 12 below for more examples.

4. What book has most influenced you?
I can only narrow it down to three books: one from my youth, one from my middle age, and one from my senior years.
When I was 18 I read War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy and my love for great literature was kindled.
When I was in my 40s I read Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy and my love for western Americana took a big hit.
The most thought-provoking book I read in the 21st century was Atonement by Ian McEwan.

5. How many books did you read in the last 12 months?
41 (I just had to add up the titles on my iPad!)

6. What book would you recommend for your younger self?
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo.

7. What book have you disliked?
Ian McEwan is one of my favorite contemporary authors. I thoroughly enjoyed Saturday which I read prior to our trip to London in 2013 and since then have read six more of his novels. All of his books are well-written but I did not like some of his surprise endings and one book, The Comfort of Strangers, I didn’t like at all.

8. A popular book is becoming a film. Do you read the book first, or see the movie first?
The book. We usually wait till a movie is on TV. I read Girl on a Train: A Novel by Paula Hawkins a couple of months ago and the movie isn’t out yet!

9. What are your favorite travel books?
Rick Steves’ travel guides. We take these along for our walks when we visit places in Europe. Most of the other books I have read lately are ebooks. For our trip to Paris in 2014 we also made good use of a delightful little book called Forever Paris by Christina Henry de Tessan. Its subtitle tells it all: 25 Walks in the Footsteps of Chanel, Hemingway, Picasso, and More.

10. What is one thing you have learned from books?
It’s a great big world out there! I love to read about people traveling somewhere, meeting other people and seeing historical sites and then go there myself.

11. Is there a book that you once loved, but can’t stand anymore?
No.

12. Is there anything you would like to add?
Before our trip to Paris in 2014 I read A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway and The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris by David McCullough. On our return from Paris I read The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo.
Before, during and after our recent trip to Scotland I read a total of four Isabel Dalhousie mysteries by Alexander McCall Smith.
Before our trip to Italy in 2009 I read A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway, Michelangelo’s Mountain by Eric Scigliano, and Angels and Demons by Dan Brown.
Before our trip to Spain in 2010 I read For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway and Tales of the Alhambra by Washington Irving.
Rick Steves doesn’t publish guide books on Australia; so in 2011 I read In a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson before going to Australia.
Finally, I would like to add that I never travel without a camera and I like to read photography books, too, especially those on the history of photography.

Friday Friends:Eachan Lee, Reader

After interviewing writers and bloggers for almost a year,  I decided it might be fun to interview readers, as well. I find it fascinating to hear what booklovers have to say about their books. Don’t you?  Welcome, Eachan!

img_4444

1. What are you reading right now?
Hollow City by Ransom Riggs. It’s the sequel to Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. The basis for his characters/story are old black and white photographs that have been rigged to twist the images in some way, like photoshopping back in the days before anyone could buy a camera, much less a digital one. It’s a bit hard to explain but for example there’s a photo that shows a kid apparently lifting a huge boulder, so the corresponding character is a kid with super strength. It’s set around the world wars, so it’s kind of an old timey, kid super hero deal. He’s a relatively new writer and it’s a pretty good effort.
2. What did you read last?
I went back and re-read the Man-Kzin wars series. The universe was created by Larry Niven, who is a big hard science fiction writer. The books themselves consist of short stories written by both established and up and coming writers who are, as he puts it, “in his playground”. It’s mostly good storytelling with differing tones/styles but all in the same setting.
3. What book has most influenced you?
When I was in my teens I read The Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman as well as Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (very cliché). I wouldn’t say they changed my lives, but some of the themes and concepts related to the human experience and human nature I’ve found true to life even to this day. The original Dune books by Frank Herbert were interesting in a similar way that spoke more collective human nature that also speaks to me.
4. How many books did you read last year?
Who knows? I kill off a book in a matter of days, so maybe 50?
5. What book would you recommend for your younger self?
Oh that’s really hard to say. I’ve been an avid reader ever since I figured out how and I don’t really have any regrets when it comes to how my tastes have evolved. Maybe I’d tell myself to avoid books that later became movies, does that count? Although the cinematic experience is sometimes great, I’ve always felt the storytelling and character development suffer in those conversions.
6. What book have you disliked?
That’s an odd one as even if I don’t particularly like a book, I usually finish it to complete the experience and see where the author is going. There’s really only one book I only managed to get only a few chapters into and that was Hunters of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. I was always wary of their writing as they opted to pursue prequels to the original Dune books rather than the sequel that was cut off after FH’s death. I tend to look down on sequels in general as it’s often a case of “write the characters before they became the hero/villain” and “match the ending to the beginning of the original books”. It’s honestly very fluffy work in my opinion and had none of the deeper themes or gravitas that underlay his father’s work. The characters were changed drastically in nature and motivation, which was ridiculous considering that they were very well established characters.
7. Do you prefer to read fiction or non-fiction? Do you prefer a genre?
I do enjoy a good history book, but I mostly read fiction. I think the vicarious experience is more complete as a fiction writer can take liberties that need to be treated carefully in non-fiction. I tend to lean towards sci-fi as I do enjoy what some people like to call speculative fiction where they fast forward existing science to create a more plausible world, then use those altered aspects to frame what should still be a human(esque) story. It’s like the difference between the Martian vs Star Wars.
8. Do you prefer fast-paced plot advancement or world building exposition?
I prefer world building over the fast read. As I tend to re-read books quite a bit, I like finding new bits or call backs/forward within a larger narrative universe. Unfortunately those quick moving plots don’t have the same fascination when I go back to them as the payoff is in the ending versus in the build up.
9. Do you prefer to read an actual book, or e-books?
I’ll read an e-book, but I prefer physical books. It just feels more soothing to me than swiping through pages. Also I have a habit of flipping back to look at previous foreshadowing and that’s a huge hassle for e-books.
10. A popular book is becoming a film. Do you read the book first, or see the movie first?
I always see the movie first. I tend to go into those movies annoyed at alterations or things that are flat out cut. There are some good adaptations, but some movies are obviously just taking the name to draw in a guaranteed audience. I Robot and World War Z are two egregious examples that pop into my head.
11. What would be the title of your life story?
Ha! I lead a decidedly mundane existence. It’ll borrow one from the bard and say Much Ado About Nothing
12. What is the ideal environment in which to read a book?
Ideally? On a beach with the breeze and the light just right. But I do a read a lot in bed.
13. Is there anything you would like to add?
Harry Potter and JK Rowling are overrated. They’re tasty bits of pop fiction, but not particularly deep or inventive. If you want your kids to experience a British author that creates interesting world, stories and characters, hand them some Roald Dahl.

Friday Friends: Booklover Dani Lorta

Happy Friday, Friends!  I have been interviewing authors and bloggers on Fridays all year, and then this summer I decided to also feature Booklovers a.k.a #humanswholovebooks. Please Jon me in welcoming a very dear friend today: Dani Lorta!

image

1. What are you reading right now?
At the moment, I’m re-reading Falling into Bed with a Duke by Lorraine Heath and You Are A Badass by Jen Sincero

2. What did you read last?
Waking Up with A Duke by Lorraine Heath

3. What book has most influenced you?
The Red Tent by Anita Diamant

4. How many books did you read last year? I’m not sure. Fewer than I would have liked.

5. What book would you recommend for your younger self? The Red Tent. I wish I had read it when I was just entering my adolescence.

6. What book have you disliked? Catcher in the Rye

7. Do you prefer a genre? Most recently, I’ve discovered historical romance is a fun way to relax.

8. A popular book is becoming a film. Do you read the book first, or see the movie first? Always see the movie first so you’re not comparing it to the book and end up disappointed.

9. What would be the title of your life story? Dani Lorta in Real Life

10. What is one thing you have learned from books? I’ve learned that bad things happen all the time. Every life has challenges. The story is in how to learn and grow from the experience.

11. Is there a book that you once loved, but can’t stand anymore? No. My books are my friends. We may not talk for a while, but we always pick up where we left off.

12. Is there anything you would like to add? I’m eternally grateful that my parents always encouraged me to read anything that interested me. My selections were hugely diverse and I have learned so much from all that I’ve read in my life.

Thank you, Dani ❤ 

Readers, have you read any of Dani’s books? What did you think? Tell us in the comments!